• Z. Mosessco Architects
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Maskit St 6

P.O.B 418

Herzliya 4610302

P: 972-9-7949400

F: 972-9-9514869

contact@mosessco.com

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@ Or & Mayan, 2017

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In anticipation of the massive immigration in the early 1990's from the former Soviet Union a master plan was required to expand the Givat HaMoreh area which is in the jurisdiction of the city of Afula and forms the mountainous part of it.
The Givat HaMoreh area until that time counted about 8,000 residents and the intention was to design additional construction to absorb another 36,000 residents.
The project was commissioned by the Ministry of Construction and Housing which appointed our firm to be used as site architect and the leading firm among the other architectural firms hired to design the different neighborhoods on the site.

1,348 hectares

Givat HaMoreh Master Plan

Other Projects

Givat HaMoreh, Afula

The new plan analyzed the current situation and its problems on different levels: topography, demography, wind direction and climatic characteristics, motor movement, pedestrian movement, finding slopes suitable for construction sites, nature and landscape, neighborhood and urban public institutions etc.
After analysis of the above parameters constraints were stratified and a system of the remaining degrees of freedom was presented.
When the degrees of freedom were determined a number of alternatives were conducted, presented and analyzed discussed in larger forums until a decision on the chosen option.

The chosen alternative was adapted to a master plan, coordinated and integrated in various professional disciplines, so that eventually an integrated program master plan change was submitted that included 868 hectares of the 1,348 hectares planned and included a total 11,000 residential units.
The plan was approved in an expedited procedure in the planning institutions and then divided into sites that were marketed by the Ministry of Construction and Housing to different contractors.
In conclusion in a record time that lasted a little over two years a master plan and changing of the outline plan was planned, approved in committees, houses were built and occupied by the first immigrants from the former Soviet Union.